The radio metric dating scam hoax

Unproven, usually ineffective, and sometimes dangerous medicines and treatments have been peddled throughout human history.Theatrical performances were sometimes given to enhance the credibility of purported medicines.Quackery is often described as "health fraud" with the salient characteristic of aggressive promotion.Since it is difficult to distinguish between those who knowingly promote unproven medical therapies and those who are mistaken as to their effectiveness, United States courts have ruled in defamation cases that accusing someone of quackery or calling a practitioner a quack is not equivalent to accusing that person of committing medical fraud.

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Each remedy was tested thoroughly, the preface stated: "Of the accuracy of the analytical data there can be no question; the investigation has been carried out with great care by a skilled analytical chemist." The book did lead to the end of some of the quack cures, but some survived the book by several decades.Grandiose claims were made for what could be humble materials indeed: for example, in the mid-19th century revalenta arabica was advertised as having extraordinary restorative virtues as an empirical diet for invalids; despite its impressive name and many glowing testimonials it was in truth only ordinary lentil flour, sold to the gullible at many times the true cost.Even where no fraud was intended, quack remedies often contained no effective ingredients whatsoever.Some remedies contained substances such as opium, alcohol and honey, which would have given symptomatic relief but had no curative properties.Some would have addictive qualities to entice the buyer to return.

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